COLLECTOR´S EDITION

The Japan Art Collection

Limited Art Edition of 600 copies worldwide, each numbered and signed.
+ 32 uniques Japanese art prints
+ Two double side books
Now on presale $125 * | After $210
 
*Pre-sale shipping time: 8/10 weeks from receipt of order.

+32 UNIQUES ART PRINTS

+ TWO DOUBLE-SIDED BOOKS IN LIMITED AND NUMBERED EDITION OF 600 COPIES

THE 53 SEASONS OF TOKAIDO + ONE HUNDRED ASPECTS OF THE MOON

In this work we present The Fifty-three Seasons of Tokaido and  One Hundred Aspects of the Moon. The first consists of a series of engravings created by Utagawa Hiroshige after making his first trip along the Tokaido Road in 1832. This road was the most important road in Japan as it connected the shogun’s capital, Edo, with the imperial capital, Kyoto.
 
The second work, by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, has the moon as the protagonist, since it is the moon that illuminates each and every one of the engravings of this brilliant 19th century artist who brings us closer to Japanese folklore and its extraordinary world of traditions, love and war. Two centuries later, the Japanese artist Mirai Kobayashi, a native of Madrid by adoption, comments and interprets the work of his ancestors.
 
The book has two covers, one dedicated to the 53 Seasons and the other to The 100 Aspects of the Moon. You decide where to start reading it.
A luxury that will allow the reader to travel under the moon and travel the road to Tokaido by the hand of a renowned painter, illustrator and calligrapher, and analyze the work with the vision of an artist who seeks the essence of art in water and thinks with the brush.
 
This edition also includes, with a die-cut, four fabulous plates, two by each artist.

THIRTY-SIX VIEWS OF MOUNT FUJI

In this limited edition we present the 36 views of Mount Fuji created by Utagawa Hiroshige and Hokusai, the most renowned ukiyo-e draftsmen, engravers and painters.
 
The book has two covers, one dedicated to Hirosigue and the other to Hokusai. You decide where to start reading it
Both are the most important interpreters of Japanese illustration, with a subtle control of chromaticism – with their mastery of green and blue – and their sense of foreground, which would later be imitated by photography and cinema.
 
This book is a great novelty because it shows the conflicting and at the same time interpenetrating visions of Mount Fuji, the highest peak on the island of Honshu, which has been considered sacred since ancient times and women were forbidden to reach the summit until the Meiji era (end of the 19th century).
 
The two best authors of ukiyo-e in an unpublished and limited edition work.
 
In the last decade, the art world has once again encountered Japanese culture. In this new and unique work, we have brought together a vision of Mount Fuji in illustrations of Uki-yo art by the most emblematic artists of the last centuries: Hiroshige and Hokusai.
 
 
These two exclusive editions include 32 fabulous limited edition prints for your collection or for display and decoration on any wall. From The Galobart Books we have selected the most spectacular ones to be part of a private and exclusive collection of Japanese art.

THE ELEVEN WORKS

Nighthawks (1942)
The artist focuses on the loneliness of the inhabitants of the Big Apple, defining the modernist movement in a melancholy atmosphere. He focuses on the less glamorous part of the city showing again his critical accent on his personal vision of the world. Fluorescent lights had just been introduced in the early 1940s; thus, the light coming from inside the restaurant casts a mysterious glow as if it were a lighthouse placed on the corner of a nearby dark and abandoned street.
Hopper eliminates any reference that allows us to know where to enter the restaurant; he allows the viewer to contemplate, but not to enter. Thus he turns the four characters, lovers of the night, into anonymous beings for us and, although some of them find the closeness of their bodies, they are distant beings from each other.

It has been a constant as a reference of the cinematographic world. Specifically, Ridley Scott obsessively showed his production and photography team of Blade Runner this painting so that his film could soak up its light, its atmosphere and be able to transfer its color palette to the screen.
Chop Suey (1929)
This is undoubtedly one of the author's masterpieces that was acquired at one of Christie's auctions for 91.8 million dollars. It represents a genre scene inspired by an urban environment where the artist, despite the use of warm colors, is able to convey a solitary atmosphere, although the action takes place in a social context. The painting conveys that despite the company, both people are in their own worlds, engrossed in their thoughts, without any interaction between them.
Gas (1940)
In this painting we can contemplate a perhaps not very artistic place, such as a gas station. All this was consciously sought by the artist, as he spent hours driving with his wife, visiting various gas stations of the time until he saw and had in his retina enough to compose the painting, which is not one in particular, but the fusion of several.

We observe in the center three bright red pumps that immediately catch our attention. And next to the first one a man, as if in the background. A man alone in the middle of the gas station and that wide wooded landscape in which the scene is framed. A road crosses the canvas diagonally into the forest. An even disturbing approach. It is a scene that conveys loneliness but also the feeling that something is going to happen next, in an image that we can define as very cinematographic.
Ground Swell (1939)
A group of young people are sailing on a sailboat. The clarity of the day can be appreciated, but as usual the author omits the sun. One of the pieces of American Modernism in which Hopper's enthusiasm for the sea can be sensed. The sailors, three men and a woman, pay no attention to each other, as they are watching a buoy. All this provokes a certain sense of isolation. In addition, the strong presence of the buoy could refer to an impending doom such as the outbreak of World War II, which occurred while Hopper was working on this painting. In addition, the clouds in the background hint at a storm, perhaps influenced by Hopper's own experience the previous year during the hurricane that hit New England in 1938. Some of his preparatory sketches for this canvas are in the Whitney Museum of American Art.
The House by the Railroad (1925)
This canvas is one of his first works upon his return to the United States and the first work acquired by the MOMA for its permanent collection. The painting shows us a scene with a Victorian house as the protagonist behind train tracks, which are intended to create a barrier of inaccessibility to the viewer. Mrs. Bates seems to be watching us from this work of art that inspired Alfred Hitchcock for the disturbing film "Psycho".
Early Sunday Morning (1930)
The painting portrays the small businesses and stores of New York's Seventh Avenue shortly after dawn. An absolutely blue sky, without a cloud, floats above a long red building. A barber pole stands in front of one of the doorways on the right side of the sidewalk, and a green fire hydrant is to the left. in the vein of the loneliness with which Hopper imbues his paintings, what he wants to convey with the empty street and the somber storefronts and vacant storefronts is the terrible state of the city during the Great Depression of 1929. The picture was painted in 1930 and it appears that the location was a building near Hopper's studio.

Its original title was "Seventh Avenue Shops." The addition of the word "Sunday" to the title was added by someone else, as the author had no recollection of the visit being on that particular day of the week.
Second Story Sunlight (1960)
According to the artist, the painting was "an attempt to paint sunlight in white with almost no yellow pigment in the white," and "any psychological ideas will have to be supplied by the viewer."

In the following years there was some controversy because it was commented that Hopper's wife, Josephine, modeled for the two women in the painting. But all this, perhaps because of the fame the painter already treasured, was disputed by Hopper's neighbors, Marie Stephens and his teenage daughter Kim, who argued that the young woman must have been based on one of them, citing the size of the bust of the woman depicted.

Hopper considered this painting one of his favorites.

New York Movie (1939)
A movie theater in New York, with an engrossed audience seduced by some Hollywood film. In contrast an usherette, who has probably seen the film hundreds of times, stands patiently waiting for the curtain to close soon, immersed in her own thoughts.

It is his wife, Jo, who posed as a model, standing under a lamp in the foyer of their apartment, as is the case with almost all the female figures in Hopper's paintings.

According to the numerous preliminary studies that exist for this painting, we can be sure that the artist not only drew his wife in several different poses for this work, but he also designed with precision the decoration of the auditorium, down to the drawing of the carpet. He also drew on several occasions the auditoriums of his favorite cinemas, such as the Strand, the Palace or the Globe.

The theater he depicts here is the Palace Theater in Times Square (well, mostly, because he also added details of other theaters to make it more beautiful).
New York Interior (1921)

Many of Hopper's works are most evocative images, set in interior spaces and featuring single, isolated figures. All of these are present in this oil painting. We can see a woman starring in the scene although her back is turned to us, and she is partially naked with her shoulders and neck in the air. By her posture and the gesture of her arm, we can intuit that she is sewing something on her knees. And it is almost certain that it is a garment she has just taken off to mend. A parenthesis in the day of any person in which he finds again the greatness of the intimate moments that awaken the curiosity of the human being.

The sense of voyeurism, as well as the dim light that permeates much of the artist's work, are also present here.
THE HASKELL'S HOUSE (1924)
Hopper and artist Jo Nivison (1883-1968), often the model for many of his paintings, were married in 1924. They nicknamed the luxurious house atop the hill the Wedding Cake House. The famous painting was originally acquired by American master painter George Bellows (1882-1925) at a Hopper solo exhibition held at the Frank K. M. M. Rehn Gallery in 1924. The artist depicted the house in two other works, both side views from Prospect Street rather than this view from Main Street.

In the painting, Hopper captured the bright summer day with a vibrant color palette, paying attention to the architectural details of the house, and to the shrubs in the garden which, with the stairs, echo the forms of the house. He layered the colors to show the sunlight on the house and the shadows, which emphasize the prominent, recessed forms of the house.
CAPE COD EVENING (1939)
Edward Hopper painted Cape Cod Evening in 1939 in Truro, a small fishing village on Cape Cod in Massachusetts. Hopper spent nearly half of his 84 summers in Truro, the rolling, sparsely populated stretch of the Cape between Provincetown and Wellfleet.

Of this painting, the artist stated, "It is not a transcription of a place, but a reconstruction from sketches and mental impressions of things in the surroundings. . . . The dry, blowing grass can be seen from my studio window in late summer or autumn. In the woman I tried to get the broad, strong-jawed face and blond hair of a Finnish type of which there are many on the Cape. The man is a dark-haired Yankee. The dog is listening to something, probably a whippoorwill [sic] or some night sound."

According to his wife, the painting was originally to be titled "Whippoorwill," after the nocturnal bird known for its distinctive song.

Previous
Next
Nighthawks (1942)
The artist focuses on the loneliness of the inhabitants of the Big Apple, defining the modernist movement in a melancholy atmosphere. He focuses on the less glamorous part of the city showing again his critical accent on his personal vision of the world. Fluorescent lights had just been introduced in the early 1940s; thus, the light coming from inside the restaurant casts a mysterious glow as if it were a lighthouse placed on the corner of a nearby dark and abandoned street.
Hopper eliminates any reference that allows us to know where to enter the restaurant; he allows the viewer to contemplate, but not to enter. Thus he turns the four characters, lovers of the night, into anonymous beings for us and, although some of them find the closeness of their bodies, they are distant beings from each other.

It has been a constant as a reference of the cinematographic world. Specifically, Ridley Scott obsessively showed his production and photography team of Blade Runner this painting so that his film could soak up its light, its atmosphere and be able to transfer its color palette to the screen.
Chop Suey (1929)
This is undoubtedly one of the author's masterpieces that was acquired at one of Christie's auctions for 91.8 million dollars. It represents a genre scene inspired by an urban environment where the artist, despite the use of warm colors, is able to convey a solitary atmosphere, although the action takes place in a social context. The painting conveys that despite the company, both people are in their own worlds, engrossed in their thoughts, without any interaction between them.
Gas (1940)
In this painting we can contemplate a perhaps not very artistic place, such as a gas station. All this was consciously sought by the artist, as he spent hours driving with his wife, visiting various gas stations of the time until he saw and had in his retina enough to compose the painting, which is not one in particular, but the fusion of several.

We observe in the center three bright red pumps that immediately catch our attention. And next to the first one a man, as if in the background. A man alone in the middle of the gas station and that wide wooded landscape in which the scene is framed. A road crosses the canvas diagonally into the forest. An even disturbing approach. It is a scene that conveys loneliness but also the feeling that something is going to happen next, in an image that we can define as very cinematographic.
Ground Swell (1939)
A group of young people are sailing on a sailboat. The clarity of the day can be appreciated, but as usual the author omits the sun. One of the pieces of American Modernism in which Hopper's enthusiasm for the sea can be sensed. The sailors, three men and a woman, pay no attention to each other, as they are watching a buoy. All this provokes a certain sense of isolation. In addition, the strong presence of the buoy could refer to an impending doom such as the outbreak of World War II, which occurred while Hopper was working on this painting. In addition, the clouds in the background hint at a storm, perhaps influenced by Hopper's own experience the previous year during the hurricane that hit New England in 1938. Some of his preparatory sketches for this canvas are in the Whitney Museum of American Art.
The House by the Railroad (1925)
This canvas is one of his first works upon his return to the United States and the first work acquired by the MOMA for its permanent collection. The painting shows us a scene with a Victorian house as the protagonist behind train tracks, which are intended to create a barrier of inaccessibility to the viewer. Mrs. Bates seems to be watching us from this work of art that inspired Alfred Hitchcock for the disturbing film "Psycho".
Early Sunday Morning (1930)
The painting portrays the small businesses and stores of New York's Seventh Avenue shortly after dawn. An absolutely blue sky, without a cloud, floats above a long red building. A barber pole stands in front of one of the doorways on the right side of the sidewalk, and a green fire hydrant is to the left. in the vein of the loneliness with which Hopper imbues his paintings, what he wants to convey with the empty street and the somber storefronts and vacant storefronts is the terrible state of the city during the Great Depression of 1929. The picture was painted in 1930 and it appears that the location was a building near Hopper's studio.

Its original title was "Seventh Avenue Shops." The addition of the word "Sunday" to the title was added by someone else, as the author had no recollection of the visit being on that particular day of the week.
Second Story Sunlight (1960)
According to the artist, the painting was "an attempt to paint sunlight in white with almost no yellow pigment in the white," and "any psychological ideas will have to be supplied by the viewer."

In the following years there was some controversy because it was commented that Hopper's wife, Josephine, modeled for the two women in the painting. But all this, perhaps because of the fame the painter already treasured, was disputed by Hopper's neighbors, Marie Stephens and his teenage daughter Kim, who argued that the young woman must have been based on one of them, citing the size of the bust of the woman depicted.

Hopper considered this painting one of his favorites.

New York Movie (1939)
A movie theater in New York, with an engrossed audience seduced by some Hollywood film. In contrast an usherette, who has probably seen the film hundreds of times, stands patiently waiting for the curtain to close soon, immersed in her own thoughts.

It is his wife, Jo, who posed as a model, standing under a lamp in the foyer of their apartment, as is the case with almost all the female figures in Hopper's paintings.

According to the numerous preliminary studies that exist for this painting, we can be sure that the artist not only drew his wife in several different poses for this work, but he also designed with precision the decoration of the auditorium, down to the drawing of the carpet. He also drew on several occasions the auditoriums of his favorite cinemas, such as the Strand, the Palace or the Globe.

The theater he depicts here is the Palace Theater in Times Square (well, mostly, because he also added details of other theaters to make it more beautiful).
New York Interior (1921)

Many of Hopper's works are most evocative images, set in interior spaces and featuring single, isolated figures. All of these are present in this oil painting. We can see a woman starring in the scene although her back is turned to us, and she is partially naked with her shoulders and neck in the air. By her posture and the gesture of her arm, we can intuit that she is sewing something on her knees. And it is almost certain that it is a garment she has just taken off to mend. A parenthesis in the day of any person in which he finds again the greatness of the intimate moments that awaken the curiosity of the human being.

The sense of voyeurism, as well as the dim light that permeates much of the artist's work, are also present here.
THE HASKELL'S HOUSE (1924)
Hopper and artist Jo Nivison (1883-1968), often the model for many of his paintings, were married in 1924. They nicknamed the luxurious house atop the hill the Wedding Cake House. The famous painting was originally acquired by American master painter George Bellows (1882-1925) at a Hopper solo exhibition held at the Frank K. M. M. Rehn Gallery in 1924. The artist depicted the house in two other works, both side views from Prospect Street rather than this view from Main Street.

In the painting, Hopper captured the bright summer day with a vibrant color palette, paying attention to the architectural details of the house, and to the shrubs in the garden which, with the stairs, echo the forms of the house. He layered the colors to show the sunlight on the house and the shadows, which emphasize the prominent, recessed forms of the house.
CAPE COD EVENING (1939)
Edward Hopper painted Cape Cod Evening in 1939 in Truro, a small fishing village on Cape Cod in Massachusetts. Hopper spent nearly half of his 84 summers in Truro, the rolling, sparsely populated stretch of the Cape between Provincetown and Wellfleet.

Of this painting, the artist stated, "It is not a transcription of a place, but a reconstruction from sketches and mental impressions of things in the surroundings. . . . The dry, blowing grass can be seen from my studio window in late summer or autumn. In the woman I tried to get the broad, strong-jawed face and blond hair of a Finnish type of which there are many on the Cape. The man is a dark-haired Yankee. The dog is listening to something, probably a whippoorwill [sic] or some night sound."

According to his wife, the painting was originally to be titled "Whippoorwill," after the nocturnal bird known for its distinctive song.

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THE COLLECTOR’S EDITION

TWO DOUBLE-SIDED BOOKS: 
 
*The 53 Seasons of Tokaido + The 100 Aspects of the Moon.
 
In 9.44 x 12.99  in.
340 pages on Fedrigoni paper volume
153 color photographs.
 
*The 36 views of Mount Fuji
 
In 6.99 x 9.44 in.
288 pages
80 color photographs

Case

The two books are delivered inside a material slipcase in red silk cloth with Japanese gold stamping.

Certificate of Originality

The certificate of originality, numbered from 001 to 600, printed on premium 250 grams Biancoflash.

Limited Edition Collection of Prints

32 art prints on fine art paper are included to own an exclusive private collection of Japanese art in 9.5×12.99 and 12.99×9.5 in. formats.

Texts

Both books are written and profusely annotated by writers who specialize in the world of Japanese ukiyo-e art and the figures of these iconic artists.

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